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this legislation helps us keep pace. and very importantly. the legislation also allows the rewards program to target those wanted for genocide, to target those wanted for war crimes, for crimes against humanity, again, the world's human worst human rights abusers. it would be killers and the top commanders of the lord's resistance army. this group has terrorized across central africa for over two decades unspeakable crimes committed against children, amputations committed against children, taking child soldiers, taking sex slaves. in accordance with u.s. policy, a small team of u.s. troops are currently in the field helping local forces hunt this killer. . they believe an effort to could help bholser their efforts, they are asking for this, they think this can make a difference on the ground. let's answer their call and send this bill to the president for his signature and i thank my colleagues for their support. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves her time they have gentleman from california is recognized. mr. berman: yes, mr. speaker, i have no further requests for time and
and credit practices. he has used his seat on the house agricultural committee and house financial services committee to help the most vulnerable americans. he has consistently played a role in raising funding levels for food stamps and nutrition programs to feed over 44 million hungry americans. he was a powerful voice against anti-immigrant laws and built bridges on the history of our nation. we will miss his principal leadership and his passion for serving as a voice for the voiceless in congress. and my fellow congressional black caucus member, laura richardson, she has many accomplishments during her brief time. she has worked hard to improve our nation's infrastructure and been advocate for inclusion of minority and women-owned businesses and opened up economic opportunities and strengthened our schools. i know she is going to move forward to make more contributions in public service because she is focused and dedicated elected official. i have to pay tribute to my sister, lynn woolsey and i can't say what a bittersweet season this is after seeing you work so many issues. lynn woolsey
and useful in that regard? >> yes, the lenders have found a useful. that has to be the way in which we judge them. when does depend on this course and the mortgage industry it depends on a specific score or a specific set of scores. we do find increasingly that in the auto industry and the credit-card industry that lenders use multiple scores when they do underwriting decisions. it would not rely on just a single score. they are increasingly looking for other information in the credit reports. they are laid on top of the original score and the original credit report that would be called as part of the application to make a determination about whether to accept a application and how to price the account. >> having a predictor of how they will handle their assets -- it is an asset especially to people who keep their credit and good shape. would that be true or false? what's it certainly helps people who keep their credit in good shape and where it is reported accurately. one of the concerns that we need to be aware of a in of the building of credit is the impact that the very first credit line
the people back home in just about every district keep asking us why it is that we can't get anything done here. well, i'm a newcomer. i've only been here about five months, and i know what is going on in terms of the political gamesmanship. this is an issue on which political games have to stop. we should have members of the republican caucus standing with us today and i hope in time we will. this has to be a bipartisan issue in the end. and so, as i have looked at what happened over the last two years, over 20 mass shootings and vitually every one of them has two things in common. the killer, the shooter used high capacity magazines and/or assault weapons to kill he is victims. and the second is almost every one of those individuals was either later or previously diagnosed with a serious mental illness that had been untreated. now i will quickly note that 95% of people with mental illness never commit a violent act. in fact, they are more likely to be victims themselves. but for that small number who might be prone to violence, we have to do something to increase awareness and treatment.
in the region, the regional leaders, people inside syria who are calling for more u.s. involvement and activity. there's an expectation that after the election the obama administration would take the wondering- we're all and waiting to see what is going to be. >> thanks to both of you for your questions. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> if you work for them, you get a mercurial, sometimes j generous, almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. men of his age and class are not going to apologize to a young secretary our typist. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of apology would be to say, i am a kind man and you're doing a good job today. the issue is never settled. he always had to get the last word in. one night going through white hall, a german bomb fell nearby. his bodyguard pushed him into a doorway. a couple of thompson's men were slightly wounded. churchill did not like to be touched. he said, thompson, do not do that. tonight, and extended 90 minute q&a with paul reid. "the last lio
. this bill allows us to have the resources we need to get more uninsured americans into the health-care system. it reduces costs and will make as a stronger nation. >> peter shumlin is joining us from vermont. thank you very much for being with us. >> thanks so much for having me. >> why did he decide to take this job? >> it is a fascinating question. they're going to start this cycle $30 million a behind were the republican governors association is. they have opportunities across the upper midwest and states like florida and on the west coast. the governor of arizona is not so convinced she% limited. she think she can run. sheikh -- she is a term limited. she thinks she can run. even some states in the south and along the atlantic coast. there are tons of opportunities for democrats. they are $30 million were the republicans governors association is. >> a lot of democratic senators are up for reelection. the pool of money will be pushed also for these governors races and more democratic than republican seat in the senate. >> there arare far more democrat of for reelection in 2014
a number of possibilities for us. how can we use these digital technologies and learn fm them to change education on our alone campus. what weighs will we see based on the experience of these mass courses. how can that transform in cambridge and boston. secondly, we see it as a way to get harvard ideas and harvard teaching out to a broader world and way to accumulate a lot of data that can be an extraordinary resource for anybody who like to use that material to ask questions about the nature of human learning and how it ought to be structured. on the point about spreading learning to the rest of the world, i have a very moving reaction to one bit of data. one of the pilot courses. when i was in india, i met with people in india who were wanting to interact with harvard. there is a need for engagement with our schools public health. we have enormous challenges in that area. i was talking to these individuals about what kind of courses we might involve them in. this online course that i described steele has overall more than 40,000 students and 9000 of them come from india. last january
for me to be here. i am sure that played a role. >> in your speech yesterday, you used the expression of the senate we efforts right yesterday, as the world's greatest deliberative body. do you think the public shares that perception? >> probably not. [laughter] we're efficient at producing results. -- deficient at producing results. what i also said yesterday was a there are problems here. the problems i believe are very clear is that we spend too much time trying to seek political advantage, too little time focused on solving the country's problems. i am sure that had a role in my decision as well. i really came here wanting to do big things. wanted to work on solving problems. there is been much less an emphasis on that lately and much more of an emphasis on how you get over on the other guy. i understand this is a team sport, a competitive environment we are in, but at the end of the day, if we're not solving problems, it is pretty of the. >> -- empty. >> can you trace the trajectory of the partisanship? >> i can see it very directly going back to 1994. newt gingrich, he had a vie
across the country. so each and every one of us here should look forward to the day with great interest and anticipation. the issues being debated today have been chosen by members of the youth parliament with the help of over a quarter of a million of your peers, and i think i'm right in saying and emphasizing of the five topics being debated, four were chosen by the public vote, and one by nyp themselves namely curriculum for life. today, of course, you debating whether to choosing the issue which you wish to have as your national campaign. this debate is one of the highlights of parliament week, and schools across the country have been taking part in create the debate, a project to encourage them to stage their own debates on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should alway
from -- as he weifang, there used to be only certain judges that held a bachelor's degree. too often china's justice system falls short of the laws on the books, both in practice and spirit. corruption is widespread. collusion among police and prosecutors and judges is common. most critical, the fundamental question of judicial independence remains ever elusive. the most sensitive cases still remain within the party control. number 3, and finally, what will be the process for future collaboration for the united states and china? i hope this group can talk about it. we have such firepower in the united states with great universities, wonderful legal societies that are willing to share our society -- our lot -- our knowledge brown's rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts -- around rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits -- package ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits? each speaker will take 15 minutes for a presentation, after which we will have a conversation and use a few moments to open it up to the audience. it is a great hono
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
but a conscious choice. in shaping the international environment for space activity, the u.s. should build a more prosperous world in which our values are taken beyond. we should also exercise some humility in facing the unknown. in their time these projects were controversial and criticized. who today would have said they should not have been done? we have seen these efforts to define us as a nation who pioneers the next frontier. we are all in this together, white house, congress, international partners and many u.s. companies that operate the capabilities. in think this committee for holding this hearing today. i will be happy to answer any questions you might have. >> thank you. i think all of you for your testimony. the committee limits questioning to five minutes for each of us. i will open a round of question. i do not ever like to say this is my last day. i do not anything last. i do not even like them to call an airport a terminal. i am thinking of the wonderful testimony you have given in the time it took you to get that ensued deliver it to us. it is great and generous. i glean from ea
is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals will not tell you, tonight it 10:00 -- at 10:00. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008, and they will say that this precedent. and indiana had -- >> when we talk about the facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. states who have subsequently -- >> correct, they talked about indiana -- let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with
're doing? caller: it is up to every individual. how has this affected all of us? i think we should all work together to try our best to prevent this from happening ever again. personally, my choice is to get rid of all of the handguns and all of the weapons that were my husband's. the guns are not needed. it is my role, it is your role, it is the role of the government. host: democratic line, manhattan. good morning. cecil, what do you think? caller: all of the people that were harassing teachers about the price of what they charge their states for the work that they do, who would want to be a teacher in a situation like this? all of those people saying that the teachers overcharged us and that the unions break the bank of the state? they should think about what a teacher has to go through. the kid's mother, the news lately was saying that she was some kind of survivalist, thinking the economist -- that the economy would crash. and that is why she had all these guns in the house. she has a mentally disturbed son with guns in the house? what is her choice? you know,what she thinking about? s
engage in that follow-up if people want to help us. our community faces real civil and human rights challenges. we can face them together. host: ari ne'eman is president and co-founder of the autistic self advocacy network. it is a nonprofit organization run by and you can go to their web site at autisticadvocacy.org. >> you want to tell our viewers and listeners what to expect. we begin with a conversation einstein on thesc simpson-bowles commission. later on we will be talking about the defense capabilities section georgia at the government accountability office regarding whether it detainees at quintana mold they can be kept at one of six u.s. detention facilities on the mainland. -- at guantanamo bay and whether they can be kept at one of the six u.s. detention facilities on the mainland. this is in it. we will see you again tomorrow morning. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up today, and look back at the 1990 budget deal followed by the president of the european parliament on the eu and u.
people, voter i.d. laws a disproportionately affect us. if white people can go through all the laws, what are you telling back people? they are less than? that is what bothers me about rhetoric. we always have to make special --there has to be a specialist when we deal with minorities. it there too feeble mind it appeared we need to make concessions. they cannot follow the rules. we treat people like victims, i do not think they want to aspire. >> defense secretary leon panetta visited the walter reed medical center tuesday to celebrate the hospital's first anniversary. it was created out of the merger of the walter reed army medical center and the bethesda naval hospital. this is about 40 minutes. >> it is my true pleasure to welcome me here this morning. over a year ago to host a dedication ceremony for what was then the new walter reed medical center. you are words that many of us that day. he pointed out if his the people that can make the biggest difference. -- he pointed out that it is the people that can make the biggest difference. i would be happy to report to you that we stand b
's not on that face. >> i've been on that bus. >> they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us in this country were starting to see people coming out and talking about their experiences, this phenomenon, that so many of us had experienced in one way or another, and had no words for. other than adolescence, other than growing up. we finally -- people were starting to stand back and say, hold on. this isn't actually a normal part of growing up. this isn't a normal rite of passage. i think there was a moment where there was a possibility for change. and director lee hirsch and i decided to start the film out of that feeling that voices were kind of bubbling up. coming up to the surface to say this isn't something that we can accept anymore. a normal part of our culture. >> film maker cynthia loewen has followed up her award winning film by gathering essays and personal stories in "bully." hear more tonight at 10:00 on "after words" on c-span2 and more book tv online, and like us on facebook. next chiefs of staff to the governors of virginia, colorado, and oklahoma talk about the fiscal issues of their
with us to help parse the meaning of these developments. we're joined from doha by our colleague, shadi hamid, and here in washington, by khaled elgindy. you have their biographical information in the packet that you received when you walked in. suffice it to say that these two gentlemen have been following egypt's politics very, very closely from well before the revolution. and you can also find a number of their recent writings on the brookings website. we've got a special page on egypt set up on the brookings website that collects all of our recent commentary. let me start by just giving you a little bit of a sense of where we stand today with respect to the constitutional referendum. the outcome, of course, is still undetermined because only part of the country voted on saturday. the other governates will vote next saturday. what we know. turnout seems to have been relatively light, maybe as low as 30 or 35 percent. the results that have been released so far indicate that slightly over half of those voting support or approve the constitution, the draft constitution -- 56-1/2 percent
its limits, only the private and public working together can get the u.s. economy fully back on track. in particular it will be critical that fiscal policymakers come together soon to achieve longer term fiscal sustainability without adopting policies that could derail the ongoing policy. thank you. i would be happy to answer your questions. >> i guess i have ad. unemproacr -- you have another paragraph that's not just targeted something else. so what good are these targets if you have to reference the calendar date? >> we will be learning about what unintended consequences they make, and we will see what else happens to the economy that affects the levels of unemployment, for example, that we hope to achieve. so for that reason, as i discussed in my opening remarks, we decided to make the right ra for asset -- criteria for asset purchases qualitative right now because we have a number of issues we need to look at before we go forward. rates were well understood and we understand the relationships between those and rate increases and the state of the economy. so we have been able to g
appreciated by us. we're also glad in a certain sense -- not that you suffered the me damage, but you understand what we're going through because of the devastation that katrina wreaked on your community. of course to have my friend, bill nelson here, who, as he said, lives with hurricanes as a way of life, we're learning how tough it is. and we have renewed sympathy for the people of florida and the gulf coast who live with these things regularly. new york state, as you know, suffered nearly $7.3 billion in transportation-related damages due to superstorm sandy. of that total, the new york mta suffered about 5 billion in dages. it's huge. i never saw anything like it. we have the longest underground tunnel in the world in the brooklyn battery tunnel. i take it almost every day i'm in new york city because my home in brooklyn is connected to it. it was totally filled with water. both tubes, from one end to the other, from the manhattan end to the brooklyn end. ere were close to 100 million gallons of water that had to be pumped out of that tunnel and it's still not back up to
has done so much. not just to mainstream the sport of golf, but he has used his fame to serve others. arnold palmer, for your great contributions to the game of golf, but mostly for your lifetime of service, congress recognizes you today with our nation's highest civilian honor. congratulations, palmer,. -- arnold palmer. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the majority leader of the united states senate, the honorable harry reid. [applause] >> as an 18 or 19-year-old young man, i came to the realization i was not going to be the athlete of my dreams. i was not big enough, fast enough, or good enough. but i still have those dreams. i get up every morning, with all the things the we do here, unemployment, energy problems -- when i get up in the morning, i get "the new york times," and the first place i go is the sports page. for a few minutes every morning, i dream of the athlete that i wanted to be. [laughter] and as i have dreamed over the decades, i thought, wouldn't it be great to be able to meet a babe ruth or lou gehrig? or maybe a rocky marciano? joe frazier? but today, i have
the comptroller general of the united states. he was also the head director of the -- of the u.s. government accountability office for almost 10 years. he is widely read and authored numerous articles on the debt deficit and he has a new initiative which i think makes tremendous sense and may doom it obscurity where things sometimes don't get discussed but david's new group is looking at the efficiencies, the inefficiency, the duplications in the government to try and find areas where we can save money without cutting. and i think it's a very interesting initiative and it's one that you all should look into and see about supporting and i hope that he will mention it at least briefly in some of his comments today. so with that introduction, i'm going to turn to the panel and i'm going to sit down and we're going to start discussion hopefully some of these issues. >> and i'll start with david on the right side and we'll just move right across. >> thanks for coming. first, there are challenges between the federal state and local levels. some of the commentators are inadequate budget control, es
like to state -- i think that one of our biggest problems is that the republican party has sold us out to grovers inquest. i think that everyone who took that pledge should be fired from the congress. they took an oath of office first. they have given away the oath. i sincerely believe that your republican party has gone down the tubes with the tea party and the evangelical christians. we no longer have freedom of religion. they want us to believe what they believe, stuff like this. that is the reason why we are facing this cliff. because of that. >> let's go next to texas. john, welcome to the conversation. >> thank you for having me on. ivory with jerry. >> jerry said that he would be comfortable with his taxes coming up. caller: it should not just be the 48%. it should be the 51% below war not paying any taxes. if they want to live in america, they should otherwise go back to where they came from. if you have got people just sitting there in the 51%, just sitting without rolling, we need to get them out of the boat. here's the thing, if you have a house and cannot pay your bills, yo
. to be honest with you, i am using a lot though as a case in point. to be honest, i thought i was going to meet with simple people. the conflict has not yet come to an end. we were pleasantly surprised. the operation we encountered was a lot more specific than we thought. they held elections. the chairman was a highly educated person with a ph.d. in engineering from france. dick also started to all different committees. -- they also started 12 different committees. judiciary, committee on finance, and they were working on a number of products. i love today to talk about those projects those councils are working on. >> can we say a few words between the relationship of this council and the military? what we specifically referred to as the free syrian army? >> a few months ago they found it coalesce. it is headed up by the inspector general. all of those groups do maintain their separate identities. they are all fighting under the banner of this council. i would say the relationship is characterized it has two characteristics, if corroborative one and a competitive one. if it were not for that th
22% of energy consumption, one-third more used in passenger trucks and cars combined. this will create thousands of u.s. jobs in the hardest-hit industries on jobs that cannot be of course using materials that are 90% made in the usa energy efficiency is unique in that it creates its own cash flow. it pays for itself. there are significant barriers that prevent this from being harvested more efficiency -- more efficiently. one is to begin -- and this is akin to building power plants. we know how to finance power plants. they supply predictable amounts of energy and utility can easily raise capital. however we lack the same capital for energy efficiency even notice understood to be the most cost-effective resource for meeting our needs. the energy efficiency efforts equate to a resource greater than any other source in the country. greater than nuclear, natural gas or coal. this is a great example policy that can move the -- this provides incentive to home owners to increase -- the greater the incentive, i the savings. transitioning allows for business model metrology
at 11:15 eastern. "booktv." >> according to a report, the u.s. now has more student loan debt and credit card debt. next, a discussion on how to ease the debt burden on students and their families. hosted by propublica and the lower east side tenement of new york city. [applause] >> with a degree comes student debt. i'm really happy to be here tonight. it is great to take some time, to have this many and this whole set up to discuss these things, and these issues. i think propublica does a fantastic job with this, as they do with everything. we are happy to have a fantastic panel with the array of experts you would want to be discussing this issue. marion has been covering this for propublica, and a month ago had a fantastic piece that would-be the result of months of investigation of the debt burden on parents. that is an aspect that not a lot of people have been talking about. although you may have read about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a schol
, that will be an avenue that a lot of us will try to pursue. as far as the administration, we need to continue to advocate for and effective foia person. some agencies are making great progress. others are not. there needs to be leadership. it means to be a leader involved in the implementation. >> before you finish up, one of the things that were mentioned in the 2008 was a tense around lobbying reform. i have a copy of it here. future employers, make white house communications public. a lot of things that have to do with promulgating information about registering lobbyists. there seems to be significant agreement that there are a lot of folks who engage in lobbying why not captive by the current regulations -- captured by the current regulations that exist. people on the left and the riots, but across the spectrum. -- people on the left and the right and across the spectrum. the demonstration on its own decided to expand the way it was tracking this information. >> there was massive under compliance. that is the problem. you can have a great policy. >> we are talking about looking into the crystal ball
the northeast has been limited support and even violates the u.s. constitution. the chairman privatizing language is no private sector proposal for the northeast corner and the real competition act was determined by the nonpartisan congressional resource -- research was determined to violate raising costs. and eliminating long distance service. we agree we need true high speed rail is in the northeast corridor but we need to have a serious conversation about how this is to happen and they focus solely on privatizing with the goal of making the administration look bad. needs to stop. i want to welcome today's families and thank them for joining us. i look forward to their testimony. i yield back the balance of my time. >> thank you. how they do for your comments. i agree with the first part of her statement rather than the latter part. [laughter] you can tell we have a good report. seeking recognition? >> thank you. thank you for all the hard work. we may not agree on a lot of things. only a transportation is important to you. it is great. as someone who rides the rails just about every w
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28